30 Second Guide to Growing Lettuce

Posted March 6, 2017 by Lauren Dibble in Gardening / 0 Comments

lettuce

guide to growing lettuce

In this series I’m compiling the quick and dirty info on growing specific vegetables. Just the basics. No fluff, no frills. When you’re sitting down in the late Winter, surrounded by seed catalogs, and your garden plan in front of you, you want a quick reference. How far apart can you plant? What pH do they need? How much water? What vegetables can you plant next to others? Which should you avoid?

This quick and dirty 30 second guide to Lettuce should help you answer all those questions quickly, without having to sort through article after article. I’ve always wanted a quick cheat sheet like this, so hopefully you’ll find it useful too!

Lettuce

Lettuce is one of those foods I will actually start craving. Especially in the hot summer sun, I can’t imagine eating a heavy dinner. A soup and salad, or grilled chicken over salad is absolute perfection.

Lettuce is also one of those low maintenance plants I love. As early as your soil allows, simply direct sow in long rows and harvest at will. Lunch or dinner becomes as simple as going out to the garden and harvesting as much as you want, rinsing, and enjoying! What could get better than that!

Check out Seeds for Generations for lettuce seeds.

Growing lettuce this year? Here’s what you need to know:

Soil pH

6.2-6.8

Sunlight

3-8 hours (grows in partial and full sun)

Water

Every 3-5 days moisten top 5 inches of soil.

Planting Time

Direct sow as soon as the soil is warm enough to be worked.

Compatible With

Carrots, Radishes, Strawberry, Cucumbers

Avoid Planting With

Celery, Cabbages, Cress, Parsley

Spacing

Direct sow in a row. Rows should be 12-18 inches apart. You can thin the lettuce plants along the row if you feel they are crowded.

Maintenance

Low/no maintenance.

Harvesting Fruit

Mature in 65-80 days, however can be harvested young.

Saving The Seeds

Once the daytime temperatures get hot enough, your lettuce plants will bolt (go to seed). Let them flower, let the flowers dry and harvest the seed pods.

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Posted March 6, 2017 by Lauren Dibble in Gardening / 0 Comments


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