Search Results for: Wild Edibles


Wild Edibles: Indian Pipe

Wild Edibles: Indian Pipe

Indian Pipe is one of my favorite plants to find while out in the woods. It’s bright pale coloring makes it seem like something from a fantasy novel. The stems grow 4-10 inches tall and are topped by a single, down-turned bell-shaped flower. It’s a unique perennial that grows without chlorophyll. The whole plant is almost translucent white, but I’ve seen them in varying shades of purple, and pink, too. They usually bloom between June and October. Sign up for our newsletter

Foraging For Wild Edibles: Shiso (Japanese Basil)

Foraging For Wild Edibles: Shiso (Japanese Basil)

I discovered Shiso in typical homesteading fashion. While I was weeding my garden I found a particularly fragrant weed. It smelled like a mixture of mint and licorice. On a whim, I transplanted the little weeds to an empty planter box much to the chagrin of my Mr. Sign up for our newsletter

Foraging For Wild Edibles: Henbit

Foraging For Wild Edibles: Henbit

One of the first Spring weeds to pop up is Henbit (Lamium amplexicaule) . I’m sure you’ve seen it, even if you didn’t know what it was. While part of the mint family, henbit doesn’t smell particularly mint-y, but it’s still very fragrant. While it is perfectly safe for us, it can cause issues with horses, sheep and cattle. (All the more reason for us to eat it!) Sign up for our newsletter

Wild Edibles: Coral Mushrooms

Wild Edibles: Coral Mushrooms

Identification  One of the most beautiful and easily-recognizable mushrooms that are just starting to appear in the woods nearby are Coral Mushrooms. Aptly named, coral mushrooms resemble common corals you would see off the coast. It is characterized by it’s soft tan pr white color, crown-like tips, and the many, thin, branches, bunched together, between two and five inches high. The tips of each branch will be topped with a small crown. Sign up for our newsletter

17 Things to Consider When Buying Your Homestead, Part 3

17 Things to Consider When Buying Your Homestead, Part 3

Earlier, Hubby and I were looking at a piece of land to buy for the future site of our Homestead. (If you missed it, catch up on Part 1 and Part 2). For those following along, we put an offer in and then backed out when we began to learn more about the property. Namely, the expensive of the renovation on the existing farm house, concerns about protected wetlands, and the proximity of the house to the main road. We have a young son and animals, so I would have constantly worried. It was a very hard decision to make, but our […]

Top 6 Hillsborough Homesteading Posts From 2016

Top 6 Hillsborough Homesteading Posts From 2016

As the year winds down, the animals are all tucked in, the garden’s been laid to rest, and days become shorter, we have time to sit back and slow down. Today, while the baby slept, I poured myself a cup of tea and took a moment to reflect. 2016 was a magnificent year. I gave birth to my first baby, got a new part time job that allows me to work from home while taking care of said baby, but on other hand, I got my heart broken over losing what I thought was our perfect homestead. I guess you can’t […]