February 6, 2017 Lauren Dibble

In this series I’m compiling the quick and dirty info on growing specific vegetables. Just the basics. No fluff, no frills. When you’re sitting down in the late Winter, surrounded by seed catalogs, and your garden plan in front of you, you want a quick reference. How far apart can you plant? What pH do they need? How much water? What vegetables can you plant next to others? Which should you avoid? This quick and dirty 30 second guide to Pumpkins should help you answer all those questions quickly, without having to sort through article after article. I’ve always wanted a…

February 3, 2017 Lauren Dibble

Here in Virginia, the Spring has been very generous with us. A few weeks of rain, and very mild temperatures. I absolutely love growing Kale, and grow it from seed every year. It is very easy to grow, and hardy and can withstand freezes and heat. This fantastic weather has ensured my Kale crop has exploded. We’ve been eating it daily and giving it away in bag-fulls. And I’m still drowning in it! (more…)

January 30, 2017 Lauren Dibble 1Comment

In this series I’m compiling the quick and dirty info on growing specific vegetables. Just the basics. No fluff, no frills. When you’re sitting down in the late Winter, surrounded by seed catalogs, and your garden plan in front of you, you want a quick reference. How far apart can you plant? What pH do they need? How much water? What vegetables can you plant next to others? Which should you avoid? Onions Onions are a staple in any American kitchen. I have fond memories of my grandmother’s kitchen. The smell of onion skin, garlic, and banana nut bread still…

January 9, 2017 Lauren Dibble 2Comment

How to simplify your homestead   Homesteading is hard. There, I said it. It seems to be a dirty little secret among homesteaders. We all imagine that we’re getting back to a simpler way of life, but homesteading often means that a simpler way of life is a harder way of life. We make it ourselves instead of buying it from a store. Much more blood sweat and tears go into growing a tomato at home than driving to a store and buying on off the shelf. (more…)

August 1, 2016 Lauren Dibble

There are several basic truths when it comes to gardening, regardless of location or plant you’re trying to grow. This is the perfect intro to beginner gardeners, those that claim to have a ‘black thumb’ instead of a green one, or the new homesteader. Plants need 3 things: (more…)

June 27, 2016 Lauren Dibble 2Comment

An invasive species to the US, Japanese Knotweed is native to Japan, China and Korea. It was brought to Europe and the US as a decorative landscaping element. (more…)

May 30, 2016 Lauren Dibble 7Comment

In this series I’m compiling the quick and dirty info on growing specific vegetables. Just the basics. No fluff, no frills. When you’re sitting down in the late Winter, surrounded by seed catalogs, and your garden plan in front of you, you want a quick reference. How far apart can you plant? What pH do they need? How much water? What vegetables can you plant next to others? Which should you avoid? This quick and dirty 30 second guide to Tomatoes should help you answer all those questions quickly, without having to sort through article after article. I’ve always wanted…

May 16, 2016 Lauren Dibble 6Comment

I discovered Shiso in typical homesteading fashion. While I was weeding my garden I found a particularly fragrant weed. It smelled like a mixture of mint and licorice. On a whim, I transplanted the little weeds to an empty planter box much to the chagrin of my Mr. (more…)

May 2, 2016 Lauren Dibble 1Comment

How to Propagate Basil From Cuttings My first stumbling venture into permaculture, the idea of creating a sustainable, never-ending supply of resources, was in propagating basil cuttings. I love harvesting seeds or propagating new plants from existing ones. You have an endless supply of free plants at your finger tips with just a bit of knowledge. (more…)

March 22, 2016 Lauren Dibble 1Comment

The first few years I started my vegetable plants from seeds were a disaster. I anxiously awaited Spring and had such bad cabin fever, I would always start my tomato plants in February! They would also sprout up fast, but fall over before I could transplant them outside. If I did manage to wait, I would plant them and they would immediately die. (more…)